15 July 2011

Another Listy-Loo

Posted by Happy Homemaker UK


Time to post my ongoing list of differences between
the US and England




 There is actually a reason for me to adopt the English accent
Automated prompted calls can't understand my American one

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A Stag & Hen Party is a bachelor & bachelorette party

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'Yummy Mummy' is a common term for a pretty, fit, well-dressed mother

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Many houses have names, not numbers for their address




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Jumble sale = Rummage sale
Boot Sale = A gathering of cars selling stuff out of their 'boot' (car trunk)

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All signs are in English only (not in French or Welsh also)

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There are no fire hydrants here (water tapped into main line under manhole cover)


Have a wonderful weekend!!

- all photos by moi -

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

Down here in Cornwall, place/street names are often in Cornish and English. Where I live for example: Camborne (English) / Cambron (Cornish).
Kay

TexaGermaNadian said...

Haha, very cute list! I had no idea about the boot sale, but love that idea. And Yummy Mummy is just too cute. Hope you are having a great start to the weekend!

Antiques And Teacups said...

My family is from the UK & My husband is a Brit. Whenever we visit I speak my childhood "Brit" with an accent...gets me service, am understood and, because I but for my antique business, I get better prices. We use Britspeak at home here in the US and occasionally say something that make our companions look at us blankly and we have to interpret.
Ruth

Jane said...

Ha! I am glad to see the transition from US to England is equally complex :-) When we first arrived in the US I tried three concession stands at the Mall one day before I managed to buy a bottle of water, because I sound my t's!

I am having to relearn the language now with my four year old - one of the hardest things to get used to is calling trousers pants, because we Brits wear our pants under our shorts :-)

Happy Homemaker UK said...

Kay - thank you for the correction. I love Cornwall :)

Jane - you are absolutely right about the 'pants' issue - I hate to say I still make that mistake - at least I have an accent to go with it so people know were not from around here :)

Marilyn said...

I'm going to a 'hen' party for my daughter next week, just the meal, then I'll 'duck' out. ;D...♥♫

Sandi @the WhistleStop Cafe said...

Fun!
This is a friday's favorite for sure :-)

Happy Homemaker UK said...

Thank you, Sandi!

Very funny, Marilyn - have fun!

Elizabeth said...

This post made me laugh, my brother and sister in law lived in Oundle for ten years in Rose cottage. The frequently told us about the mix ups in language. Love the pheasant photo from the previous post.

Grammy Goodwill said...

What a great list. Funny that we think we speak the same language ~ not so much, huh?

Anonymous said...

But you know what 'loo' means in England! I never could get them to understand this when I have been in the US-I had to learn to ask for the 'restroom' -which made me laugh!!

Butterbean Row said...

I love to read the different ways that the Brits say things. You really do need a translator sometimes. It must be frustrating and fun.

julie@jam-n-jilly said...

oh! i love it! i might have to start using some of the lingo here in florida! i am so glad you stopped by! and for the sweet comment! its so nice to hear from another blogger! cant wait to look around!

Kirsteen said...

Up here in Scotland, in some places we have signs in Gaelic and English.

One of my best friends is American so we often come across some strange differences in our language!

Nieves R said...

It is very interesting to keep on learning from you about differences between England and USA. It is always nice to read your posts! Have a nice Monday too!

Amanda said...

Gotta love the car boot sale!

lisaroyhandbags said...

Fun post! When we first moved to Ireland our neighbourhood in Killiney had no house numbers either. We lived in the little "mews" coach house behind the main house. No postal codes either. Those mail men were pretty darn talented to get us our mail everyday :)

ann said...

And lori and lu, too. (probably not spelled correctly)

ann said...

lory

Pet said...

The spell of England, can't help it, can you?
Thanks for these little dives in the land.

Hong Kong Badger said...

Not being understood on automated phone messages must be SO frustrating!

It's always funny the little differences in language from either side of the pond...

Jen of Country Weekend said...

What fun! The British are more colorful and descriptive.

Please Do Not Feed The Animals. said...

I have American friends and there are so many tiny little subtle differences in what we call things - it is great fun! Love your photos!

Hines-Sight said...

Great photos as usual. I'm doing my first link party on August 1. I want it to be a one-stop post for easy meal planning with tips, recipes, etc.

I would love for you to join me.

Leigh

Emily said...

Love the names for houses rather than numbers. Wish we could adopt that practice!

Paul said...

Yes, as the others said, it depends where you are in Britain as to whether the signs are written in more than one language.

The grid and number system for most American towns and cites should make it easier for a stranger to find themselves around, but I still get lost just as much as in the UK.

Paul
http://fromsheeptoalligators.blogspot.com/